Upcoming Events For Astrophysics Seminar

Tue Oct 24, 2017

Astrophysics Seminar: Prof. Dan Milisavljevic, Purdue University

12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
184 Nieuwland Science Hall

Radical frontiers of stellar evolution

Prof. Dan Milisavljevic
Purdue University

Core-collapse supernovae mark the catastrophic deaths of massive stars and are among the most powerful explosions in the universe. They shape and enrich their host galaxies; produce a variety of exotic objects including neutron stars, black holes, and some gamma-ray bursts; are a major site of nucleosynthesis and dust; are prodigious emitters of neutrinos; and are likely to be strong Galactic sources of gravitational waves.

     Recent observations are dramatically transforming our understanding of the final stages of a massive star's life. Much of this massive star evolution revolution has been propelled by the discovery of major eruptions preluding supernova explosions within one year of core collapse. Such eruptions are not easily explained by our current knowledge of the physical mechanisms that drive mass loss in evolved massive stars, and may have significant ramifications for fields of research that depend on the predictions of stellar feedback.

     I will review how radio-through-X-ray investigations of the entire supernova life cycle--from progenitor star, to explosion, to remnant--are helping to “reverse engineer” solutions to key open questions in stellar evolution. I will also explore how unexpected connections between precision supernova tomography and future time domain surveys (including LSST) can provide firm observational tests for state-of-the-art simulations attempting to predict and interpret the multi-messenger signals from the next Galactic supernova.

Posted In: Astrophysics Seminar

Tue Oct 31, 2017

Astrophysics Seminar: Dr. Ben Montet

12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
184 Nieuwland Science Hall

Making the most of exoplanet searches

Dr. Ben Montet
University of Chicago

Thanks to 20 years of dedicated searches for exoplanets, we now know of the existence of thousands of exoplanets. The search to detect these planets has required observations of hundreds of thousands of stars; future missions like TESS and WFIRST will target millions of stars. What happens to the stars that we don't detect planets around? Imaging and transit search missions have also allowed advances in stellar and galactic astronomy well beyond the core mission requirements. In this seminar, I will discuss some of the lagniappe science results enabled by previous and future exoplanet searches which significantly add to their legacies. Specifically, I will discuss efforts to search for long-term brightness variations of stars in the Kepler field caused by stellar magnetic cycles. I also will discuss how observations of transiting brown dwarfs can help us understand the atmospheres of field brown dwarfs. I will conclude with a look to the future, describing how the WFIRST microlensing mission will continue the transiting planet revolution.

Posted In: Astrophysics Seminar

Tue Nov 7, 2017

Astrophysics Seminar: Dr. Alex Richings

12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
184 Nieuwland Science Hall

Title TBA

Dr. Alex Richings
Northwestern University

Hosted by Dr. Nicolas Lehner

Posted In: Astrophysics Seminar

Tue Nov 14, 2017

Astrophysics Seminar: Dr. Philipp Grete

12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
184 Nieuwland Science Hall

Energy transfer in compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

Dr. Philipp Grete
Michigan State University

Hosted by Prof. Balsara

Posted In: Astrophysics Seminar

Tue Nov 28, 2017

Astrophysics Seminar: Dr. Daniel Angles Alcazar

12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
184 Nieuwland Science Hall

Title TBA

Dr. Daniel Angles Alcazar
Northwestern University

Hosted by Dr. Lehner

Posted In: Astrophysics Seminar

Tue Dec 5, 2017

Astrophysics Seminar: Prof. Mordecai-Mark Mac Low

12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
184 Nieuwland Science Hall

Title TBA

Prof. Mordecai-Mark Mac Low
American Museum of Natural History

Hosted by Dr. Crass

Posted In: Astrophysics Seminar