Upcoming Events For Astrophysics Seminar

Tue Jan 29, 2019

Astrophysics Seminar: Prof. Brian O'Shea, Michigan State University

12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
118 Nieuwland Science hall

The circumgalactic medium: connecting theory to observations

Prof. Brian O'Shea
Graduate Director, Department of Computational Mathematics, Science and Engineering;
Associate Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy
Michigan State University

Roughly half of all the baryons in a galaxy like the Milky Way reside in the circumgalactic medium, or CGM — an enormous, diffuse cloud of gas that is outside of the disk of the galaxy, but gravitationally bound to the galaxy.  There is a great deal of evidence that a galaxy's CGM interacts strongly with its stars and interstellar medium, and that this interaction is responsible for regulating many of the bulk properties of the galaxy. The development of a deep understanding of the physical mechanisms that control this system is only now occurring, facilitated by both a variety of observations and theoretical advances.  In this talk, I will focus on recent theoretical advances in our understanding of the CGM, and how this understanding affects our interpretation of observations.

Posted In: Astrophysics Seminar

Tue Feb 5, 2019

Astrophysics Seminar: Dr. Tuguldur Sukhbold, OSU

12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
184 Nieuwland Science Hall

Title TBA

Dr. Tuguldur Sukhbold
Ohio State University

Hosted by Dr. Placco

Posted In: Astrophysics Seminar

Tue Feb 19, 2019

Astrophysics Seminar: Prof. Evan O'Connor, Stockholm University

12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
184 Nieuwland Science Hall

Core-Collapse Supernovae from 1D to 3D

Prof. Evan O'Connor
Stockholm University

Core-Collapse supernovae are triggered by the implosion and subsequent explosion of the iron core in an evolved massive star. Since the core is shrouded from us by the overlying layers of the star, numerical simulations (and the odd neutrino detection of a Galactic supernova) are our best look into this extreme engine that powers one of the most energetic events in the Universe. Nature is 3D, and it is critical to simulate core-collapse supernovae in three dimensions because of the important hydrodynamic instabilities that can be present, however they are computationally expensive. With 2D models, we now starting to be able to perform systematic studies across a range of stars, and in 1D codes we are able to achieve excellent agreement between otherwise completely independent codes. In this talk I will present a global comparison in 1D between six core-collapse codes, the beginnings of a systematic study of core-collapse in 2D, and simulations where we explore fundamentally 3D phenomena.

Posted In: Astrophysics Seminar

Tue Apr 2, 2019

Astrophysics Seminar: Dr. Jonas Lippuner, Los Alamos National Lab

12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
184 Nieuwland Science Hall

Title TBA

Dr. Jonas Lippuner
Los Alamos National Lab

Hosted by Prof. Mathews

Posted In: Astrophysics Seminar

Tue Apr 9, 2019

Astrophysics Seminar: Dr. Rana Ezzeddine, MIT

12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
184 Nieuwland Science Hall

Title TBA

Dr. Rana Ezzeddine
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Hosted by Dr. Placco

Posted In: Astrophysics Seminar

Tue Apr 16, 2019

Astrophysics Seminar: Chad Bustard, UW Madison

12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
184 Nieuwland Science Hall

Title TBA

Mr. Chad Bustard
Department of Physics
UW Madison

Hosted by Dr. Lehner

Posted In: Astrophysics Seminar