Tue Jan 23, 2018

Our Universe Revealed: Dr. Jason Kalirai, Multi-Mission Project Scientist, Space Telescope Science Institute

7:30 PM - 8:30 PM
101 Jordan Hall of Science

Hubble’s Recent Hits and a Look Forward to the James Webb Space Telescope

Dr. Jason Kalirai, Multi-Mission Project Scientist, Space Telescope Science Institute

Part of the Our Universe Revealed Lecture Series

Posted In: Special Lectures and Events

Wed Jan 24, 2018

Physics Colloquium: Dr. Jason Kalirai, STScI

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
118 Nieuwland Science Hall

Seeing Galaxies as Collections of Stars

Dr. Jason Kalirai
STScI

Since the pioneering work of Henry Norris Russell 100 years ago, the study of nearby stellar populations in the Milky Way has served as a foundation for our quest to understand the nature of galaxies in the Universe. Today, studies of resolved stellar populations constrain fundamental relations that define how stars form, how they evolve over time, and how they dramatically transform themselves in the final stages of stellar death.  Understanding these processes give us a prescription to interpret all light from the Universe and to measure the physical state of galaxies. In this talk, I'll present new highest-precision observations that we've taken of nearby stellar populations, using the biggest ground and space based telescopes such as the Keck 10-meter telescope on Mauna Kea and the Hubble Space Telescope in orbit. These data are providing unprecedented constraints on our understanding of how stars evolve, and act as a bridge between studies of the nearby and distant Universe. I'll also discuss new opportunities for stellar population studies with an impressive suite of astronomical tools that are now on our horizon - GAIA, JWST, LSST, WFIRST, 30-meter telescopes.

Posted In: Colloquia

Thu Jan 25, 2018

Physics Colloquium: Dr. Chunhui Du, Harvard University

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
123 Nieuwland Science Hall

Control and local measurements of the spin chemical potential in a magnetic insulator

Dr. Chunhui Du
Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Physics, Harvard University

This lecture has been generously funded through The IBM Corporate Lecture Series, created to foster women's inclusion in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

In recent decades, a large scientific effort has focused on harnessing spin transport for providing insights into novel materials and low-dissipation information processing. We introduce single spin magnetometry based on nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond as a new and generic platform to locally probe spin chemical potentials which essentially determine the flow of spin currents. We use this platform to investigate magnons in a magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet (YIG) on a 100 nanometer length scale. We demonstrate that the local magnon chemical potential can be systematically controlled through both ferromagnetic resonance and electrical spin excitation, which agrees well with the theoretical analysis of the underlying multi-magnon processes. Our results open up new possibilities for nanoscale imaging and manipulation of spin-related phenomena in condensed-matter systems.

Posted In: Colloquia

Mon Jan 29, 2018

Nuclear Physics Seminar: Dr. Sophia Han

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
124 Nieuwland Science Hall

Title TBA

Dr. Sophia Han
University of Tennessee Knoxville

Hosted by Prof. Surman
 …

Posted In: Nuclear Seminar

Tue Jan 30, 2018

Astrophysics Seminar: Mr. Steven Villanueva, OSU

12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
184 Nieuwland Science Hall

A Year with the DEdicated MONitor of EXotransits and Transients (DEMONEXT), an Automated and Robotic Telescope for Exoplanet and Transient Follow Up

Mr. Steven Villanueva
The Ohio State University

DEMONEXT is a 0.5-m robotic telescope that has been in operation since May 2016. Fully automated, DEMONEXT has observed over 200 transits of exoplanet candidates for the KELT survey, including confirmation observations of KELT-20b. DEMONEXT achieves 2-4 mmag precision with unbinned, 20-120 second exposures, on targets orbiting V<13 host stars. Millimagnitude precision can be achieved by binning the transits on 5-6 minute timescales. During observations of 8 hours with hundreds of consecutive exposures, DEMONEXT maintains sub-pixel (<0.5 pixels) target position stability on the CCD during good observing conditions, with degraded performance during poor observing conditions (<1 pixel). DEMONEXT achieves 1% photometry on targets with V<17 in 5 minute exposures, with detection limits of V~21. In addition to the 150 transits observed by DEMONEXT, 50 supernovae and transients haven been observed for the ASAS-SN supernovae group, as well as time-series observations of Galactic microlensing, active galactic nuclei, stellar variability, and stellar rotation.

Posted In: Astrophysics Seminar

Mon Feb 5, 2018

Nuclear Physics Seminar: Mr. Cory Thornsberry

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
124 Nieuwland Science Hall

Title TBA

Mr. Cory Thornsberry
University of Tennessee Knoxville

Hosted by Prof. Ahn

Posted In: Nuclear Seminar

Tue Feb 6, 2018

Astrophysics Seminar: Dr. Claudia Scarlata, University of Minnesota

12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
184 Nieuwland Science Hall

Title TBA

Dr. Claudia Scarlata
University of Minnesota

Hosted by Prof. Howk

Posted In: Astrophysics Seminar

Our Universe Revealed: Jared Coughlin

7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
101 Jordan Hall of Science

To Infinity and Beyond: An Exploration of Travel Between the Stars

Mr. Jared Coughlin
Graduate Student, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame

From warp drives to generation ships, science fiction is rife with creative ways that humanity may end up travelling among the stars. In this talk we explore the feasibility of some of the more popular proposed methods and, assuming that they are possible, what the pros and cons of each may end up being.

Posted In: Special Lectures and Events

Wed Feb 7, 2018

Physics Colloquium: Dr. Long Ju, Cornell University

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
118 Nieuwland Science Hall

Title TBA

Dr. Long Ju
Kavli Fellow
Kavli Institute of Nano Science
Cornell University…

Posted In: Colloquia

Mon Feb 12, 2018

Nuclear Physics Seminar: Dr. Brian Bucher

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
124 Nieuwland Science Hall

Title TBA

Dr. Brian Bucher
(ND PhD)
Idaho National Laboratory

Hosted by Prof. Aprahamian

Posted In: Nuclear Seminar

For past events, view our Events Archive