Why Physics at Notre Dame

Bachelor of Science with a Major in Physics

Science undergraduates may choose from two different majors within the Department of Physics: Physics and Physics in Medicine. The course sequences in these two programs are designed to accommodate the academic and professional interests of the majority of physics majors.

The basic physics major is a particularly flexible option for students, and is the one that is chosen by the majority of undergraduates majoring in the department. Students following the physics major program will gain a broad understanding of the concepts of physics. Depth is gained through the addition of one or more supplemental concentration programs offered through the department. Depth is gained through the optional addition of one or more concentration programs offered through the department. Two of these concentration programs, Advanced Physics and Astrophysics, help to prepare the student for graduate work in physics, astronomy, or astrophysics. The Applied Physics concentration allows the student to combine the physics major with a sequence of courses in a particular engineering discipline. Completion of these concentrations is indicated on the student's final transcript.

Students with interests in other areas have time to explore second-major, minor, or concentration options offered through departments in the College Science or in the College of Arts & Letters. Students with alternative advanced physics courses should discuss these with the director of undergraduate studies.

While no supplemental concentration is required of physics majors, interested students are allowed and encouraged to add as many concentrations as their schedules and interests allow. Students following the Physics in Medicine major are not allowed to add concentrations; their major program is designed to accommodate the special interests of students intending careers in medicine.

Physics as a second major is an option for students in the Colleges of Engineering, Arts & Letters, or Business.